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Fighting Speeding Tickets – Knowing What to Do and Not to Do

Fighting Speeding Tickets – Knowing What to Do and Not to Do

You get pulled over for speeding. Your first reaction is to get out and give the officer a piece of your mind. Doesn’t he know you can’t afford this? Stop right there. If you want a successful speeding ticket defense you need to back up and start over or you might as well start writing the check for the fine.

Tickets are not exactly what you’ve always heard. Your best defense is a good offense. Start by remembering that it is nothing personal. Unless you owe the officer money he isn’t taking it out on you. So remain calm. You just have to remember that you do not admit anything. Don’t get it confused: you aren’t denying it, either. But for your sake right now, go with the flow.

They will probably ask you something along the lines of “do you know why you are being stopped”, or “do you know how fast you were going?” Again, the answer is “no, I don’t.” Let him tell you. If you say something like, “I’m not really sure” or I was only going…”, etc. you are asking to be proven guilty. Just let them write the ticket and sign it. Another misconception is if you sign the ticket you are admitting guilt. That is simply not true. The only thing you are admitting is that you are getting a ticket.

Here is something you can do: while he is writing, take note of the conditions, road, time, etc. Anything that you can remember that will distinguish you at that moment needs to be noted. Don’t write it down while the officer is there, wait until you both leave. If they see you taking notes the officer will know you are going to be a problem in court and he will make it a point to be there with his act together. You won’t stand a chance then. When you get the citation, drive off and go somewhere and write. The more information you collect the better prepared you’ll be in court.

Most citations are thrown out if you are prepared and the officer doesn’t show. A good speeding ticket defense starts with staying clam and to start getting ready to present your case in court.It appears that your web host has disabled all functions for handling remote pages and as a result the BackLinks software will not function on your web page. Please contact your web host for more information.…

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Winning Your Divorce – Men Only

Winning Your Divorce – Men Only

Hey, guys, have you ever thought about why men who go through a divorce generally lose their case? That is, they generally lose the right to live in the home where they once lived with their family, they lose the right to the custodial care of their children, they lose the right to decide how their earnings will be spent, and they somewhat lose a part of who they once where before the devastation of the divorce.

Statistics suggest that men lose their divorce cases because they do not have adequate representation in the court room, and they do not have access to the insider secrets and strategies to win their divorce. They simply do not know how to play the divorce game. They generally do not know the strategies to counter the dirty little tricks of the trade that divorce lawyers employ to win a victory for the wives. In the court room, everyone knows that women have an unfair advantage and that the uninformed man does not stand a chance of winning a divorce or child support or alimony case.

However, guys, your divorce does not have to be another statistic. You can fight back and even win your divorce. There are some tactics and strategies designed just for men who find themselves in a battle for their future life and financial stability. You do not have to lose your shirt, your self-esteem, home, car, or children. You can save just about everything that a divorce generally takes away from you. You can talk away from your ex feeling no pain or like you have lost your life.

The strategies and insider secrets to winning a divorce that was once only known by lawyers, and particularly, by your wife’s lawyer is now revealed. These insider secrets and tips to winning your divorce were revealed by an attorney who got tired of screwing over men who were ignorant of the divorce process.

A good education into the divorce process begins with Jim Williams’ book, “Insider Secrets and Strategies That Men Must Know to Win Their Divorce!”…

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Appeal a Speeding Fine – How Not to Do It

Appeal a Speeding Fine – How Not to Do It

Receiving a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP) in the post can come as a shock, especially if you had no idea that you had been caught speeding. It could be the case that the speeding ticket was issued in error; perhaps you were not driving at the time or the police used the wrong registration details. If this is the case it is worth considering an appeal against the fine. Although the majority of speeding fine appeals are successful, there are several pitfalls to watch out for which could make the difference between winning the appeal against a speeding fine and losing it.

Any speeding fine appeals must be made within 28 days of the date on the speeding ticket. If you try and appeal after this date, it is likely that your appeal will be denied outright and you will have to pay the fine. Claiming ignorance is also not likely to help your case; as a driver it is your responsibility to know the speed limits of the roads on which you are travelling. If you think that the speed limit was not clearly signposted, that is another matter and in this case you will need evidence which proves your point.

Perhaps the most complex point to argue in a speeding ticket appeal is that of who was driving at the time the speeding fine was issued. With speed cameras there is photographic evidence but this is usually quite unhelpful when trying to identify a driver. Pretending not to know who the driver was at the time the fine was issued is not a good idea as you could end up with a £1,000 fine and up to six penalty points on your licence. Ultimately, the best way to appeal a speeding ticket is to do so truthfully; give all the information as accurately as possible and, if you have been issued a speeding fine unfairly, you could stand a good chance of winning the appeal.…

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Fighting the Charges of a Speeding Ticket

Fighting the Charges of a Speeding Ticket

A speeding ticket is given to a motorist who has gone above or below the speed limit posted for a particular zone. There are many different innovations that keep track of the speed at which vehicles move on the road, and these can be the evidence that the authorities will use to bring the case to court. Although it is usually futile to try and get out of the charges, there are some ways that can help to reduce the charges or have them tossed out.

Advice

Many lawyers will say that in order to have a better chance of not being issued a speeding ticket one should be cordial to the officer or officers at the scene. It does not help to be rude or insulting when explaining one’s reason why there was an escalation or reduction of speed. First time offenders have a small chance of not being issued one if they are sober and earnestly state that they have good reason to be going too fast or too slow. Some reasons are acceptable, such as emergency cases, which will be immediately clear to the officer when the situation is explained. Another possibility is the lack of signs in the vicinity where the incident may have occurred. Even as one is charged with too much or too little speed, one can still have hope regarding having the officer speak well of the person during the hearing. A good way to improve one’s chances is to follow up the situation directly with the officer in charge and to continue to be courteous and friendly with him or her. One does not necessarily need to convince the officer to drop the charges, but it is important to point out to that the individual involved in the incident is a good person and that he or she has no intention of doing it again. If the speeding ticket hearing pushes through, complying with the court date is important, as it will show the sincerity of the person. Not appearing will only aggravate things and make the offense seem even bigger.

It is important to avoid going above or below the speed limits set by the state for each road and street. Traffic infractions such as these can be put down on one’s record and, for some states, will reflect in the in the point system that may be in place for each state. Some point systems accumulate the points and will eventually suspend the license of the driver. Other motorists prefer to keep their record clean with regards to traffic infractions because insurance rates will be increased by their company if they have had many brushes with the law. This is very damaging to the finances and can actually be a big motivation for drivers.…

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New IRS Guidance – The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit

New IRS Guidance – The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit

Section 45R of the Internal Revenue Code (“Code”) offers a tax credit to certain small employers including tax-exempt organizations that provide health insurance coverage to their employees. The credit is effective for taxable years beginning in 2010.

Section 45R was added to the Code by section 1421 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Affordable Care Act”), enacted March 23, 2010. In Notice 2010-44 recently issued by the IRS, the IRS provides guidance on section 45R and what requirements must be met to qualify for the credit. This article discusses these requirements as described in the Notice.

Employers Eligible for the Credit

An employer is eligible for the credit if (1) the employer has fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees (“FTEs”) for the taxable year, (2) the average annual wage of its employees for the year is less than $50,000 per FTE, and (3) the employer pays at least 50 percent of the premiums of the health insurance coverage for their employees. However, a federal or state employer is not an eligible small employer for purposes of the credit unless it is a section 501(c) non-profit organization.

Specifically, we can determine whether an employer is eligible for the credit by following the array of steps set forth in Notice 2010-44:

Determine the employees who are taken into account for purposes of the credit.

Determine the number of hours of service performed by those employees.

Calculate the number of the employer’s FTEs.

Determine the average annual wages paid per FTE.

Determine the premiums paid by the employer that are taken into account for purposes of the credit.

Determining the Employees Taken into Account for Purposes of the Credit

Generally, employees who perform services for the employer during the taxable year are taken into account in determining the employer’s FTEs, average wages, and premiums paid. However, certain individuals are not taken into account as employees for purposes of the credit.

Accordingly, their wages and hours are disregarded in determining the FTEs and average annual wages, and the premiums paid on their behalf are not counted in determining the amount of the credit. These excluded individuals include sole proprietors, partners in a partnership, shareholders owning more than two percent of an S corporation, and any owners of more than five percent of other businesses. Family members of these owners and partners are also not taken into account as employees. A family member is defined as a child, sibling, step-sibling, parent, step-parent, a niece or nephew, an aunt or uncle, or a son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law or sister-in-law. Any other member of the household of these owners and partners who qualifies as a dependent for tax purposes is not taken into account as an employee.

Seasonal workers are disregarded in determining FTEs and average annual wages unless the seasonal worker works for the employer more than 120 days during the taxable year.

Determining the Number of Hours of Service Worked by Employees for the Taxable Year

An employee’s hours of service for a year include the following: (1) each hour for which an employee is paid, or entitled to payment, for the performance of duties for the employer during the employer’s taxable year and (2) each hour for which an employee is paid, or entitled to payment, by the employer on account of a period of time during which no duties are performed due to vacation, holiday, illness, incapacity including disability, layoff, jury duty, military duty, or leave of absence. Only a maximum of 160 continuous hours may be counted as hours of service worked by employees for periods of vacation, holiday, illness, or incapacity.

In calculating the total number of hours of service which must be taken into account for an employee for the year, the employer may use any of the following methods: (1) determine actual hours of service from records of hours worked and hours for which payment is made or due, (2) use a days-worked equivalency whereby the employee is credited with 8 hours of service each day, or (3) use a weeks-worked equivalency whereby the employee is credited with 40 hours of service for each week. The number of hours per employee cannot exceed 2,080 hours.

Calculating the Number of an Employer’s FTEs

We demonstrate by example. Consider an employer during the 2010 taxable year who pays 5 employees wages for 2,080 hours each. The employer’s FTEs would be calculated by multiplying 5 by 2,080 and dividing by 2,080, which equals 5 FTEs.

In some circumstances, an employer with 25 or more employees may qualify for the credit if some of its employees work part-time. For example, an employer with 46 half-time employees (meaning they are paid wages for 1,040 hours) has 23 FTEs and, therefore, …

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Tax Help News – How Obama’s Health Reform Means More Tax-Reporting Requirements For Your Business

Tax Help News – How Obama’s Health Reform Means More Tax-Reporting Requirements For Your Business

There’s been a lot of confusion about what is and what is not in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – otherwise known as President Barack Obama’s health care reform.

Of course, despite the rumor mongering that goes so well with contact politics, there aren’t death panels. But there is a big change to the way you do business and pay your taxes.

The U.S. Congress used the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to legislate a new tax-reporting requirement for companies. Here’s the kicker: If your business purchases goods or services valued at more than $600 from any other company or entity, you will be required to report the expenditure to the IRS and the vendor by using a Form 990-MISC.

In essence, this new requirement, which will be in effect for purchases made in 2012, forces companies to snitch on their vendors, informing the IRS of revenue streams as tiny as $600. Before we discuss whether this is effective tax enforcement policy, consider the practicality of the law: Do your have the time, and does your business have the resources, to file forms for each and every vendor to whom you pay $600 or more every year? The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants is betting the answer is no.

In July letters to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, Alan Einhorn, chairman of AICPA’s Tax Executive Committee, asked the government to repeal this new requirement.

“This expansion of information reporting may prove to be so burdensome to small businesses that we believe it will significantly contribute to hurdles to growth and formation that businesses face,” Einhorn wrote.

In creating this new requirement, the government’s logic here is pretty simple: Companies will have difficulty under-reporting income if all transactions above $600 are reported to the IRS.

But with companies receiving hundreds, if not thousands, of 990 forms every year, how can the reporting requirement work effectively when it’s surrounded by a new paperwork tsunami? In his letter, Einhorn described any annual reconciliation process as “mind numbing.”

He wrote: “The AICPA strongly supports the efforts to reduce the tax gap, but we believe the extraordinary burden in this instance far outweighs the potential benefit.”

Given the budget crunch the federal government faces, it’s not shocking Congress is looking to close that tax gap. But a policy such as this one – which is not only impractical but also pits businesses against their clients – has the potential to overburden U.S. companies at the same time these companies are struggling in an ailing economy.

Putting aside the practicality of this requirement, you as a business owner must prepare yourself for your new tax-reporting obligations. New tax requirements means more ways in which the IRS can penalize you for failure to report cash flow. Arm yourself with the knowledge of what you must do in order to protect the well-being of your business.

At Tax Resolution Services, Co. we are dedicated to providing affordable tax help to businesses and individuals alike who find themselves in trouble with the IRS. For more information or to receive a FREE tax relief consultation, visit or call (888) 699-7630.…

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Self Employment and IRS Collections

Self Employment and IRS Collections

These days, there are a lot of people who are finding themselves self-employed in some way. There’s about 10 million self-employed workers in the United States alone and the number continues to grow every year. After all, with the job market the way it is, it’s a lot easier to try to work out your own business plan or do freelance work within your field. But when it comes to IRS collections, self employment can be a little tricky come tax time.

First you need to determine whether your status is self-employment. You are self-employed if you carry on a business as a independent contractor or a sole proprietor, if you are part of a partnership that carries on a trade or business, or you are just in business for yourself. Part-time work is included in this.

What falls into these lines of work can be a little confusing. While some things are straight forward, like if you write articles freelance for various publications; others can be tricky. Some internships that pay a stipend instead of giving credit will often give a 1040 form that has you down as self-employed. If taxes weren’t taken out of the stipend, you will have to pay them. Before taking on any job or internship, you should inquire as to what it is considered in case it isn’t obvious. There’s also some confusion over husband and wife joint businesses, depending on whether you are partners or one is an employee of another.

You must file an income tax return if your yearly earnings as a self-employed individual are more than $400. If you are running your own business where you are paying yourself, subtract your business expenses from your business income to figure out your end of the year earnings. The self-employment tax in the United States is currently set at 15.30% so you can get an idea of what IRS collections will be.

If you find yourself in need of tax debt relief after figuring out what you owe, you may want to look into getting help dealing with a payment arrangement. It’s also good to have a professional look over your papers before filing, because filing as a self-employed person can be very confusing if it’s not something you are used to. You don’t want to be taken advantage of in any way or lose out on deductions that can help you in the long run, or even turn you around from owing to getting a refund.…